English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) yields a highly effective essential oil and has the sweetest overtones of all the lavender varieties. They are also much more cold-hardy than the French and Spanish varieties. We have two types of English lavender – Hidcote and Munstead.

A certain someone with a good-sized garden (I’ve seen it with my own eyes) has been giving a bewildering array of reasons why she can’t participate in Grow Your Own.

Nothing grows in Colorado, she dislikes rabbit soup, she can’t buy beans to sprout, her neighbour’s cat pooped on her lawn, Medha’s got summer holidays ….

Well, I thought of snipping some dried lavender flowers and mailing them out – just to confuse her and maybe, get her to stop hacking into my comments form.

When I stepped out this morning, scissors and camera in hand, I encountered some winged gourmets who like lavender as much as we do.

Cabbage White Butterfly

I got a recipe idea from this furry dude.

I wondered what lavender honey would taste like. Honey produced from bees that have fed on Provencal (French) lavender is popular in France and the Mediterranean.

I added some lavender blossoms to my favourite orange blossom honey. I put it in the microwave on low power (power level 3) and cooked it for 2 minutes, then let it seep for an hour. Or you can make it on a very low flame on the stove top, simmering the honey for about 8 minutes. You can strain it if you want to. It’s not necessary.

Make sure your lavender blooms are organic, sans chemical fertilisers or pesticides.

I also made some lavender-flavoured sugar. Simply add some lavender blooms to organic raw cane sugar and store in an airtight container.

HONEY AND SUGAR infused with MUNSTEAD LAVENDER

Our entry for

Andrea’s brainchild, hosted by us this fortnight. Deadline: July 30, 2008.

and for Jihva for Edible Flowers at Soul Food

There’s a packet of lavender on its way to Manisha. Now let’s see what excuse she can concoct for not participating in Procure Grow Your Own.

Also check out
Chocolate Pudding infused with Lavender

- Bee

Filed Under: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Share


40 Comments

  1. Dee says:

    Bee, the pics look great , I was thinking of a lavender Icecream , this year we went to clip some flowers from a farm , it was a great experience!!! Love the pics and I would like to see what manisha cooks up too :)

  2. Cham says:

    What a flavor and color combo too :) The lavender sugar and honey can be flavored any simple dessert!

  3. sunita says:

    That is such a wonderful idea…and poor M, no more excuses now :-P

  4. Rachna says:

    hey send this to Jihva na…..

  5. Manisha says:

    Gulp! She has thrown down de gauntlet. In a big way. (said like Calypso from The World’s End – better effect that way)

    I promise never to open my big fat mouth ever again on this blog. I also promise never to threaten J with a meme.

    Er…I might also be moving very soon – like today. With mail on ‘return to sender’ status.

    Such a lovely blog. I will surely try this recipe.

  6. OhioMom says:

    Oh my I love your lavender pics, and really like the idea of adding it to sugar and honey, for my tea :)

  7. shilpa says:

    This is fun :D . Last time I talked to her, she was in some nursery checking out plants to buy – I assumed to-buy part!!!). I can’t believe she didn’t plant anything. And you made sure she will be cooking something (no clicking pictures and eating it raw) :D . Ok Ok..I will shut up, don’t want to see her sad again.

    Love those lavender bushes and the bees :) . Beautiful. Lavender honey is very new. This is another thing I have never tasted.

  8. nags says:

    the pics of the lavendar are really pretty! love the color :)

  9. Bharti says:

    So pretty! Absolutely love it!

  10. Manisha says:

    Shilpa, sweetie, what are you growing?

  11. enjay says:

    Ooh..lavender honey! I remember that killer chocolate pudding, and the goodly havoc it caused in our household.

  12. Nirmala says:

    Bee, tose bees would have been longing to meet “Bee” and these lavender blooms seems to be a reason :) Anyway I envy Manisha as I too love lavender but have never smelled or seen a real lavender flower. Infusing them into honey is a brilliant idea. And the pic of your sinful choc pudding were still in my eyes. I have something to add. Ayurveda and Siddha says not to cook honey over heat. Have you read anything about this ?

    no. we do cook honey often in desserts and jams.

  13. arundati says:

    fab pics……esp the one with the bee(the furry one!!) in close up ….am just trying to imagine the flavours and fragrance of lavender honey……….

  14. DK says:

    aaaaaaaaaah! the bliss of finally smelling the flowers and your food in this blog once again! Its still not “Phatak” openining – if u know what i mean- but then its wayyyyyyyyy less than the usual – I think 10min-12m Thats something I can do to come here and spam ur comment section – NO IP BLOCKIN! its taken me some real hard work to get to spam here u know ;-)

  15. Suganya says:

    That sure is a lovely idea. Its surprising that something that looks as delicate as lavender has such a strong flavor. I have never used fresh lavender flowers so far. Manisha shouldn’t be whining anymore.

  16. Manisha says:

    I whined? Dammit. I was asking some very serious questions!

  17. Anita says:

    What will you do with the sugar, O Bee? You are a honey person… I use sugar… you have my mailing address?

    i have a recipe in mind. will post it soon.

  18. Jyothsna says:

    Bee meets bee? Nice pic! Lavendar sugar….that must taste lovely in a cake or muffin, or maybe in a glass of milk.

  19. sia says:

    lol @ manisha’s comment… by the way you can always direct that mail to me manisha ;) and i am good at keeping secret ;)

    beautiful photos…

  20. Lakshmi says:

    I just wrote at Suganya’s about your Lavendar Chocolate Pudding from last year (she has something similar). Honey definitely lends a better flavour and colour to cakes.

  21. Sunshinemom says:

    I have heard of vanilla pods in sugar but adding lavendar is a great idea – trust you to come up with such things:) Nature can be really inspiring, isn’t it?

  22. kalva says:

    Wow Jai n Bee, wonderful pictures… love the bee… looks so crips.. and your honey awesome…..

  23. richa says:

    what a beauty, those lavender blossoms, stunning!
    love the idea of lav-sugar…sweet :)

  24. Hendria says:

    the close up of the bee is amazing….. !!!!!

  25. I just made lavender honey for the last DB challenge. Isn’t it great?! Beautiful photos – WOW!

  26. I am enchanted with these pictures.

  27. Nupur says:

    What a feast for the eyes…
    Off-topic: Have the CLICK raffle winners been announced? Thanks.

    tomorrow.

  28. Madhuram says:

    Those pictures are too good Bee. Very innovative idea of infusing lavender in honey.

    Reg, substitution for khoya, I think dry milk powder will also be good. But are you thinking of non dairy substitution?

    not non-dairy. i was thinking of milk powder as well.

  29. Meera says:

    What a lovely post. Loved the lav-sugar, lav-honey. Very creative.

  30. Sia, psst! I am in disguise but just wanted to let you know that I will definitely share! Just as long as you on the right side of the pond? :-D

    Anita, she said post, not mail.

    About the Ayurveda thing: honey is made by bees at about 90F or so. The chemical composition of honey changes when it is heated and the Vaids believe that along with it, is lost all the health benefits. I was told therefore that if honey crystallized in winter, to place it in hot water instead of heating it in the microwave. Then later on I was told that heating gently is the key. Commercial honey has already been heated at high temps to prevent crystallization. Which is another reason why health buffs will tell you to buy raw (and unfiltered) honey. I have to tell you that I can taste the difference cos I just got a bottle of raw unfiltered honey from the Boulder Farmers Market. Yum!

  31. Anita says:

    My turn to go away with the heavy heart…I did note that she said post a recipe… so be it. Maybe I can get lavender flowers from the mountains nearby. Sigh. And make my own lavender sugar.

  32. dhanggit says:

    lavender honey are definitely the best honey we have here in southern france…:-) our lavender in the garden are already in full bloom :-) just the way you pictured it out on this post :-)

  33. Beautiful pix. I feel like I have just taken a little trip to Provance.

  34. Norm says:

    I made lavender cookies last week. Just a simple shortbread cookie with a couple of tsp of lavender flowers. I was worried about them tasting of soap, or pot pourri, but they were fabulous!

  35. Zlamushka says:

    Holla, wow, lavender is in right now. I just posted my lavender cookies :-) yum, honey looks good.

    Guys, I hope you are whipping something up from What´s For Lunch Honey? for this month´s T&T.

  36. K says:

    Excellent pictures! I love lavender as well. I just snipped some stems last week!

    One thing I wanted to tell you though, according to Ayurveda, you should not heat honey on the direct heat. My grandpa used to collect wild honey in India and always used ‘double boiler’ method to heat honey. You mention that you used microwave on low setting that might be okay. but in general its a good idea to use double boiler.

  37. Srivalli says:

    i just need to follow manisha’s trail I suppose…hheeh…those lavenders are surely a treat for eyes!

  38. nidhi says:

    I have been going through your blog, and the best feature about your blog definitely are the pictures you’ll manage to take.
    These pics of the lavender are the best. I had never seen lavender before, to think that they actually grow in your own garden, I’m feeling jealous.

  39. Anonymous says:

    Bee and Jai, the pictures are so lovely. I always feel inspired when I see your photos. Your lavender and honey sounds perfect. (And I must apologize. I visited this post earlier but got distracted and didn’t leave my comment. Thanks for being such wonderful hosts for Grow Your Own.)

  40. [...] which flower you use, make sure it’s organic. We use an organic fertiliser once a year on our lavender plants and avoid chemical sprays or pesticides. Unfortunately, we cannot say the same about our roses. We [...]



rss email

  • Archives

  • Categories